Environmental guidance for your business in Northern Ireland & Scotland

WEEE - Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment

WEEE - Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment

The Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Regulations aim to reduce the environmental impacts of electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) when it reaches the end of its life.

You must comply with the WEEE Regulations if you manufacture, import, rebrand, distribute or dispose of EEE, such as household appliances, IT equipment, lighting equipment and power tools.

This guideline explains who is affected by the WEEE Regulations and which types of equipment are covered. It outlines the key responsibilities for each type of affected business.

Additional resources

  

The Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Regulations affect almost all businesses. You need to make sure that you understand your obligations and what you must do to meet them.

What you must do

You must comply with the WEEE Regulations if you:

  • manufacture, import or rebrand electrical or electronic equipment (EEE)
  • distribute or sell EEE
  • generate any WEEE
  • refurbish or repair WEEE
  • treat, recycle or recover WEEE.

Producing EEE

You are a producer if you:

  • manufacture and sell EEE under your own brand
  • resell EEE products produced by another supplier under your own brand (rebranding)
  • import or export EEE into the UK or another European Union member state on a professional basis.

The regulations apply to all producers regardless of their size.

For information on producer responsibilities, see the page in this guideline: Producers of electrical and electronic equipment – what you must do

Distributing EEE

You are a distributor if you sell EEE for use in households. This includes selling products via:

  • retail outlets
  • wholesale outlets
  • mail order
  • the internet
  • TV shopping channels
  • other distance-selling methods.

For information on distributor responsibilities, see the page in this guideline: Distributors of electrical and electronic equipment – what you must do

Using EEE

If your business uses EEE you must deal with it correctly once you no longer need it. See the page in this guideline: Users of electrical and electronic equipment - what you must do

Refurbishing WEEE

If your business repairs or refurbishes WEEE you may need a pollution prevention and control (PPC) permit, waste management licence or an exemption. See the page in this guideline: Repairing, refurbishing and storing WEEE.

Treating and recycling WEEE

If your business treats, reprocesses, recovers or recycles WEEE you must have a PPC permit, waste management licence or an exemption. See the page in this guideline: Treating and recycling WEEE.

Exporting WEEE

If you export WEEE for reuse, treatment or reprocessing you must comply with export controls. See the page in this guideline: Exporting WEEE.

Operating a producer compliance scheme (PCS)

PCS operators arrange for their members' WEEE to be collected and treated, recycled or reused. If you operate a PCS you must meet certain requirements. See the page in this guideline: Operating a WEEE producer compliance scheme

Further information

You can use the NetRegs e-learning tools to get a good overview of key issues. These tools are free to use and cover the essential points of each topic. They might be useful as a refresher course, or to make sure that staff have a good understanding of their environmental responsibilities.

  • Preventing pollution – a general guide
  • Duty of care
  • Sinks, drains and sewers
  • WEEE
  • Generating renewable energy

All are available at: NetRegs e-learning tools

The goods covered by the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Regulations fall into the following categories:

  • large household appliances, eg fridges, radiators and air conditioning appliances
  • small household appliances, eg sewing machines, toasters and clocks
  • IT and telecommunications equipment, eg computers and their accessories, calculators and phones
  • consumer equipment, eg TVs, radios and musical instruments
  • lighting equipment, eg fluorescent lamps and non-household luminaires
  • electrical and electronic tools, eg drills, welding equipment and lawnmowers
  • toys, leisure and sports equipment, eg electric train sets, video games and slot machines
  • medical devices, eg dialysis machines, ventilators and radiotherapy equipment
  • monitoring and control instruments, eg smoke detectors, thermostats and other instruments used in industrial installations
  • automatic dispensers, eg drinks, food and money dispensers
  • display equipment
  • cooling appliances containing refrigerants
  • gas discharge lamps.

WEEE includes equipment that has a wind-up or solar mechanism, or that runs on batteries. From 1 January 2014, solar panels, solar panel systems and batteries are covered by the WEEE Regulations.

There is an alternative take back scheme for solar panels

The PV Cycle DTS

Equipment not covered by the WEEE Regulations

The regulations do not apply to:

  • equipment where electricity is not the main power source through battery or mains supply, eg a gas cooker
  • equipment where the electrical or electronic components are not needed to fulfil its main function, eg a musical birthday card
  • equipment that is part of something that is not EEE - other waste regulations may apply to such equipment, eg the End-of-Life Vehicle Regulations cover the electrical components of vehicles
  • equipment designed exclusively to protect the UK's national security and intended for specific military purposes
  • filament light bulbs
  • household light fittings of any kind
  • large-scale, stationary industrial tools
  • fixed installations
  • high-voltage equipment that is designed for use with a voltage rating exceeding 1,000 volts AC or 1,500 volts DC
  • implanted and infected medical equipment.

The WEEE Regulations apply to finished products. Components, sub-assemblies, consumables and spares are usually exempt. However, accessories, such as headphones, computer keyboards, antennas and connecting cables, are classed as WEEE if they do not have a function by themselves and are only used with another product.

If you manufacture, rebrand or import electrical and electronic equipment (EEE), you are a producer of EEE and you must:

  • join an approved producer compliance scheme
  • pay for the collection, treatment, recovery and environmentally sound disposal of your market share of household waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE)
  • label all new electrical and electronic products with a crossed-out wheeled bin symbol and producer identification mark
  • make available information to WEEE treatment and reprocessing facilities about new products put on the UK market to help with effective treatment, reuse and recycling
  • give your producer registration number to distributors you supply equipment to
  • keep records for at least four years, including the amounts of EEE placed on the UK market, and sales to end users in other European Union member states

You can get advice on how to meet your legal requirements by contacting:

  • The Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) in Northern Ireland
  • The Scottish Environment Protection Agency in Scotland.

These organisations regulate producers' obligations under the WEEE Regulations.

Contact your environmental regulator

Join a producer compliance scheme

You must join an approved producer compliance scheme - there are around 40 to choose from. Alternatively, you could establish your own scheme for your business or for a group of businesses. All schemes must be approved by either the Environment Agency, NIEA or Scottish Environment Protection Agency.

The NIEA and SEPA provide lists of producer compliance schemes.

NIEA: Producer compliance schemes

SEPA: Producer compliance schemes

See the page in this guideline: Operating a WEEE producer compliance scheme.

Design your products for recycling

You must make sure that your products comply with limits on the use of certain hazardous substances.

Restriction on the use of certain hazardous substances in Electrical and electronic equipment (ROHS)

Your products may also have to meet energy labelling and ecodesign requirements.

Energy labelling and ecodesign of energy-related products

You should design your products so that they can be easily repaired, recycled and dismantled. Improving the design, to make your products easier to recycle, can make it easier to meet your WEEE obligations, especially for non-household equipment.

If you are affected by WEEE regulations you may also have obligations under the Batteries Directive.

Further information

GOV.UK: Electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) producer responsibilities

If you sell electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) to household users you must enable these customers to return waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) products on a like for like basis, when they purchase a new product. This is known as ' retailer take back'.

You must also provide customers with information on how they can return waste products, and keep records.

As a distributor you do not have to provide free take back for customers who are businesses, but you may be asked to help business customers and suppliers to meet their obligations.

Provide a take-back system for household WEEE

You must provide a system that enables household customers to dispose of their WEEE free of charge. You can:

  • offer in-store take back
  • join the distributor take-back scheme
  • provide an alternative free take-back service.

You can offer free in-store take back of old equipment when consumers buy a similar item. You should accept goods within a reasonable period, eg within 28 days of the new item being purchased. You can dispose of the WEEE you collect via a producer compliance scheme, which must accept it free of charge. However, they may charge you a collection fee.

You should approach the compliance scheme that collects WEEE from your nearest local authority civic amenity site to arrange for the proper treatment and recycling of the WEEE you receive. You can find a list of local authorities and their appointed compliance schemes on the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) website.

GOV.UK: Local authorities' producer compliance schemes

If you join the nationwide distributor take-back scheme you do not need to offer in-store take back. Membership fees are used to provide funding for local authorities operating designated collection facilities for WEEE at civic amenity sites. You can read about the distributor take-back scheme on the Valpak website

Valpak: Distributor take-back scheme

If you choose not to offer in-store take back and do not join the distributor take-back scheme, you must provide an alternative take-back service. The service must be free and easily accessible to your customers.

Whichever method you use you must store WEEE safely and securely to prevent pollution. You must also comply with the normal waste controls when transporting WEEE.

Duty of care – your waste responsibilities

Offer a collection on delivery scheme

You may offer a 'collection on delivery' scheme as a service to your customers, for example collecting old bulky goods when delivering new replacement goods. You can charge household customers for collection, but this must only cover the cost of transport and handling, it must not include any treatment or reprocessing costs. You must still provide either in-store take back, an alternative free service or join the take-back scheme.

Provide WEEE information to your customers

You must provide your household customers with written information on:

  • environmental impacts of the substances in new EEE and WEEE
  • reasons for separating WEEE from other waste
  • the meaning of the crossed-out wheeled bin symbol
  • how they can safely dispose of WEEE for proper treatment and recycling free of charge.

You must also display information for customers on the benefits of take-back schemes. This could be posters, leaflets or on a website.

You must keep records of the information you provide, any household WEEE that has been collected and the information provided to customers for at least four years.

Enforcement of WEEE distributor obligations

The Vehicle Certification Agency (VCA) enforces the distributor obligations and provides advice on compliance.

VCA: Retailer and distributor obligations

Comply with other requirements

New equipment must also comply with restrictions on the use of certain hazardous substances (ROHS) and may have to meet energy labelling or ecodesign requirements.

ROHS

Energy labelling and eco-design

If you are affected by WEEE regulations, you may also have obligations under the Batteries Directive.

Batteries regulations

Further information

GOV.UK: Electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) producer responsibilities

If your business uses electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) you should be aware of your responsibilities when you dispose of it.

The producer of the electrical equipment is usually responsible for the cost of treating and recycling non-household waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), but business users will sometimes have to pay.

You must comply with your duty of care. This includes:

  • storing waste equipment safely
  • using a registered waste carrier
  • keeping a waste transfer note when equipment leaves your site.

Duty of Care – your waste responsibilities

Equipment bought by your business

If your business bought EEE before 13 August 2005, the waste is known as 'historic WEEE'.

If you are replacing the equipment, the producer of the replacement equipment must take your unwanted item if you request it, even if they are not the original manufacturer.

If you're not replacing the equipment, you need to make sure the WEEE is disposed of in accordance with the duty of care and hazardous waste legislation.

Duty of Care – your waste responsibilities

If your business bought equipment after 13 August 2005, the waste is known as 'non-historic WEEE' or "new WEEE". A bar underneath the crossed-out wheeled bin symbol indicates that the WEEE is non-historic. The EEE producer is responsible for financing the treatment, reprocessing and disposal of the equipment unless both parties agree to an alternative arrangement. You should contact them to find out what arrangements are in place.

If you agree with a producer to make your own arrangements to deal with WEEE, you must make sure it is treated, recycled, recovered and disposed of correctly.

If your business rents or leases EEE the organisation that provides the equipment will normally be responsible for disposing of it.

When you buy new EEE you should keep the WEEE registration number of the equipment producer. Use this to contact the producer when you need to dispose of the products. The producer's compliance scheme is responsible for the WEEE. The original producer can give you information on the take-back system available to you.

Your EEE suppliers and retailers can dispose of business WEEE for you, but they may charge you for this service.

If the EEE producer refuses to take responsibility for your waste:

  • In Northern Ireland contact the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA)
  • In Scotland contact the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA)

Contact your environmental regulator

Good practice

Tips for buying new electrical equipment

Before your business buys any new equipment, ask the following questions:

  • Do you really need to buy a new product?
  • Could you repair your existing unit?
  • Can your existing device be upgraded?
  • Could you buy refurbished equipment from another business?

If your business must buy new equipment, look for a product that:

  • has been designed for easy recycling
  • uses resources efficiently, eg it has a low energy rating
  • has a low impact on the environment, eg it is made from recycled materials.

Further information

WEEE: Disposal guidance for your business (PDF, 1.11MB)

What you must do

If you repair or refurbish waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) you may need a pollution prevention and control (PPC) permit, waste management licence or a registered waste exemption. You must have the relevant permit, licence or exemption before you carry out this activity.

Storing WEEE for reuse, treatment or recovery elsewhere

You can register an exemption from waste management licensing to collect and store up to 80 cubic metres of each of several types of WEEE for up to three months before it is taken for recovery somewhere else. If you are storing fluorescent tubes the limit is 50 cubic metres. You must:

  • store it securely to avoid damage that may prevent its reuse or treatment
  • use a storage site with an appropriate weatherproof covering and impermeable surfaces, with a bund where necessary to stop hazardous substances from escaping
  • comply with the conditions of your exemption.

You do not need to register an exemption for storing WEEE if you are:

  • a retailer taking part in an in-store take-back scheme for household WEEE
  • a business storing WEEE that you have produced.

NIEA: Paragraph 50 Exemption – The secure storage of waste electrical and electronic equipment WEEE

SEPA: Waste management licensing exemptions

Crushing waste fluorescent tubes

If you crush fluorescent tubes before they are collected for recovery you may be able to register an exemption from waste management licensing if you:

  • crush up to 3 tonnes of waste in 24 hours
  • make sure the mercury concentration in emissions does not exceed 50 microgrammes per cubic metre
  • store the waste glass and mercury in secure containers under weatherproof covering.

You must register this waste exemption with your environmental regulator. In Northern Ireland you will need to renew the exemption every 12 months.

NIEA: Paragraph 51 - The crushing of gas discharge lamps

SEPA: Waste management licensing exemptions

Repairing and refurbishing WEEE

If your business repairs or refurbishes certain WEEE you may be able to register an exemption from waste management licensing.

In Northern Ireland you can register for an exemption if you:

  • handle up to 5 tonnes of WEEE per day
  • store up to 80 cubic metres of WEEE, and no waste is stored for longer than 12 months
  • store dismantled parts carefully to prevent damage
  • store the components safely under waterproof covering and on impermeable surfaces
  • store hazardous waste in suitable containers.

The NIEA will need to inspect your business premises. They will charge you a fee to cover this cost.

You will need to renew your registration every year. The renewal fee is less than the registration fee.

NIEA: Paragraph 49 Exemption – The repair, refurbishment and storage of WEEE

If you want to treat 5 tonnes of WEEE or more per day you will need a PPC permit or a waste management licence.

In Scotland you can register for an exemption if you:

  • handle up to 2 tonnes of WEEE per day, or 5 tonnes per day if it contains cathode ray tubes or chlorofluorocarbons
  • store up to 50 cubic metres of WEEE, or 80 cubic metres if it contains cathode ray tubes or chlorofluorocarbons, and no waste is stored for longer than 12 months
  • store dismantled parts carefully to prevent damage
  • store the components safely under waterproof covering and on impermeable surfaces
  • store special waste in suitable containers.

SEPA will need to inspect your business premises. They will charge you a fee to cover this cost.

You will need to renew your registration every year. There is no renewal fee.

SEPA: Waste management licensing exemptions

If you want to treat 2 tonnes of WEEE or more per day you will need a PPC permit or a waste management licence.

Further information

GOV.UK: WEEE: Evidence and national protocols guidance

What you must do

If your business treats waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) you must meet all of the following requirements:

  • have a waste management licence, a pollution prevention and control (PPC) permit or an exemption
  • be an authorised treatment facility (ATF) or approved authorised treatment facility (AATF)
  • treat WEEE according to the guidance on best available treatment, recovery and recycling techniques.

Licences and exemptions

You can apply for an exemption from waste management licensing if you:

  • repair or refurbish WEEE
  • store WEEE while it is waiting to be treated or recovered elsewhere
  • crush waste gas discharge lamps, eg fluorescent tubes.

See the page in this guideline: Repairing, refurbishing and storing WEEE.

If you cannot meet the conditions of an exemption you must have a waste management licence or a PPC permit.

Authorised treatment facilities (ATFs)

WEEE ATFs are licensed to treat WEEE, but they cannot issue evidence notes. Evidence notes can only be issued by an AATF on their behalf.

If you want to issue evidence of receipt of WEEE to a producer compliance scheme you must apply to your environmental regulator:

  • the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) in Northern Ireland
  • SEPA in Scotland

and be granted approval to become an AATF.

NIEA: WEEE treatment facilities

SEPA: Approved treatment facilities

If you are an AATF you must provide quarterly reports to your environmental regulator showing the amount of WEEE you have:

  • received for treatment
  • sent to a different facility for treatment - including details of the ATF or AATF it was sent to
  • issued evidence for reuse as a whole appliance
  • delivered to an approved exporter for treatment and recovery or recycling outside the UK.

You must comply with the conditions of your approval and make sure that WEEE materials are recovered or recycled to the appropriate targets for each category of WEEE.

In Northern Ireland you must also provide your environmental regulator with a report from an independent auditor confirming that the evidence notes you issued match up with the amount of WEEE you received for each approval period.

In Scotland, SEPA has taken an enforcement position not to require businesses to provide this report. SEPA officers will instead make checks during site visits.

Treatment, recovery and recycling techniques

If you treat WEEE you must use the best available treatment, recovery and recycling techniques (BATRRT).

Northern Ireland: BATRRT guidance from the Department of Environment (DOE)

Scotland: BATRRT guidance from DEFRA

Recovery and recycling targets for WEEE

Recycling is reprocessing waste materials in a production process for reuse.

Recovery includes activities such as:

  • incineration with energy recovery
  • recovery of metal and metal components
  • recovery of inorganic materials, eg glass and plastic.

Collecting, sorting, treating and processing WEEE is not recycling. Evidence from AATFs covering these types of activities does not show that you have met the recovery and recycling requirements.

If you recover and recycle WEEE you must meet targets for the amount of WEEE you recover and recycle. You must include evidence of this in your reports to the NIEA or SEPA.

WEEE recovery and recycling targets

Equipment category Minimum amount recovered by the average weight of the equipment Minimum amount of components, materials and substances reused or recycled by the average weight of the equipment
Large household appliances 80% 75%
Small household appliances 70% 50%
IT and telecommunications equipment 75% 65%
Consumer equipment, eg televisions 75% 65%
Lighting equipment (excluding gas exchange lamps) 70% 50%
Electrical and electronis tools 70% 50%
Toys, leisure and sports equipment 70% 50%
Monitoring and control instruments 70% 50%
Automatic dispensers 80% 75%
Gas exchange lamps n/a 80%

 

Further information

GOV.UK: WEEE: Evidence and national protocols guidance

What you must do

You should only export waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) if you are sure that it will be recovered or recycled safely in the receiving country. If you are unsure, ask the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) or the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) for advice.

If you want to issue evidence of the export of WEEE for reuse to a producer compliance scheme you must apply to the NIEA or SEPA to become an approved exporter.

If you are an approved exporter you can only issue evidence notes for exporting WEEE if it is to be reused as a whole appliance.

NIEA: WEEE treatment facilities

SEPA: Approved treatment facilities

If you are an approved exporter you must submit quarterly returns to the NIEA in Northern Ireland or SEPA in Scotland. These reports must include the amount of WEEE exported for recovery, recycling and reuse as whole appliances. You must also report the amount of non-obligated WEEE you export. This is WEEE that does not come from compliance schemes.

In Northern Ireland you must also provide the NIEA, with reports from an independent auditor confirming that the evidence notes you issued match up with the amount of WEEE you received and exported for each approval period.

In Scotland SEPA has taken an enforcement position not to require businesses to provide this report. SEPA officers will instead make checks during site visits.

If you want to export WEEE for reuse, treatment or reprocessing you must also ensure that you comply with legislation on the shipment of waste.

Importing and exporting waste

Producer compliance schemes (PCS) arrange for waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) to be collected and treated, recycled or reused on behalf of their members. They buy evidence from approved authorised treatment facilities (AATFs) and approved exporters (AEs) to demonstrate that the WEEE has been treated, reused or recovered.

What you must do

If you want to operate a PCS you must:

  • apply to the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) or Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) for approval
  • demonstrate that you can collect and arrange the treatment and recycling of the amount of your members' WEEE obligations for at least three years.
  • Follow the code of practice for designated collection facilities

GOV.UK: Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) collection: code of practice

NIEA: Application forms and guidance for PCS operators

SEPA: Contact SEPA

You may also need to register as a waste carrier or broker to transport or trade waste.

Waste carriers, brokers and dealers

Requirements when operating a PCS

If you operate a PCS you must give your environmental regulator (NIEA or SEPA):

  • quarterly reports, including the amount of new electrical and electronic equipment placed on the market by your producers
  • a declaration of compliance supported by evidence to show how you have paid for the treatment and recycling of your members' WEEE
  • an operational plan by 31 July each year
  • records of the amount in tonnes of household and non-household WEEE recovered, treated and recycled.

You must also:

  • register each of your producer members for each compliance period
  • arrange for WEEE to be collected and transported to an authorised treatment facility (ATF), AATF or AE for treatment or recovery
  • ensure AATFs or AEs are treating WEEE to the required standards and enough material and components are recycled or recovered
  • obtain enough evidence to show you have met your members' obligations
  • co-operate with other PCSs.

Operational plans

The operational plan must include:

  • evidence that you have the money and technical expertise to operate the scheme
  • details of how you plan to treat, recover and recycle household and non-household WEEE
  • the designated collection facilities, AATFs and AEs you intend to use
  • an estimate of the amount of WEEE you will handle.

There are different obligations for collecting household WEEE and non-household WEEE. Contact the NIEA or SEPA for further information.

Contact your environmental regulator

Further information

GOV.UK: WEEE: apply for approval as a producer compliance scheme

Some waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) is classified as hazardous/special waste. This includes WEEE that contains hazardous components or substances such as:

  • polychlorinated biphenyls, eg in capacitors
  • ozone-depleting substances, eg in fridges and freezers
  • asbestos
  • fluorescent tubes
  • nickel cadmium batteries
  • cathode ray tubes, eg in some televisions and older computer monitors.

What you must do

You must store waste safely and securely to prevent pollution. You must keep different types of hazardous/special waste separate, and keep hazardous/special waste and non-hazardous waste separate.

If you are responsible for disposing of WEEE and it contains hazardous substances you must make sure it is treated at an approved authorised treatment facility that is authorised to accept hazardous waste.

Find your nearest waste site

Hazardous/special waste

This page provides links to the full text of key pieces of environmental legislation relating to waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). The websites hosting the legislation may list amendments separately.

If you are setting up an environmental management system (EMS) for your business, you can use this list to start compiling your legal register. Your legal adviser or environmental consultant will be able to tell you if other environmental legislation applies to your specific business.

Environmental management systems and environmental reports

Northern Ireland

Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (Charges) Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 2014/202 Set the fees and charges for the registration and monitoring of Producer Compliance Schemes, Small Producers and Treatment or Export Facility Operators to be paid to the Department of the Environment under the WEEE Regulations 2013. They align fees and charges with those in England, Scotland and Wales. These 2014 regulations revoke 2006 WEEE charges regulations.

Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (Waste Management Licensing) Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 2006/519. Amends the Waste Management Licensing Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2003 by providing exemptions for WEEE recovery operations.

Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Regulations 2013 SI 3113

Aim to combat the rapid growth of waste electronic and electrical equipment (WEEE) and its impact on the environment due to its hazardous content. Measures are established for its treatment, reuse, recovery and recycling. From 1 January 2019, the scope of EEE covered by the Regulations changes, incorporating a wider range of products.

The Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (Amendment) Regulations SI 2015 No 1968

Amends the 2013 Regulations by adjusting some of the financial obligations of producers and producer compliance schemes. Clarifies the meaning of “WEEE from private households” and the meaning of certain regulations.

Scotland

Waste Management Licensing Amendment (Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment) (Scotland) Regulations SSI 2007/172. Amends the Waste Management Licensing Regulations 1994 to allow granting or varying of waste management licences for WEEE and specifies technical competencies required for treating WEEE.

Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Regulations 2013 SI 3113

Aim to combat the rapid growth of waste electronic and electrical equipment (WEEE) and its impact on the environment due to its hazardous content. Measures are established for its treatment, reuse, recovery and recycling. From 1 January 2019, the scope of EEE covered by the Regulations changes, incorporating a wider range of products.

The Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (Amendment) Regulations SI 2015 No 1968

Amends the 2013 Regulations by adjusting some of the financial obligations of producers and producer compliance schemes. Clarifies the meaning of “WEEE from private households” and the meaning of certain regulations.

Further information

PPC Permits

Waste management licences

ROHS

Energy labelling and eco-design

Environmental legislation on NetRegs

Whats new on NetRegs

  • Waste – Duty of Care Roles and Responsibilities

    The Northern Ireland Environment Agency has published a short guide to the duty of care responsibilities including advice and information for waste producers, carriers and those accepting, storing and treating waste.

    https://www.daera-ni.gov.uk/publications/waste-duty-care-responsibilities

  • Please let us know your thoughts on our new website

    What do you think about our new and improved website. We want your feedback on what you like, what you don’t like and ways we can continue to improve the website. Follow the link to complete the very short survey: NetRegs website – User feedback

  • NEW guidance on Environmental Management Systems

    We have recently updated and improved our guidance on Environmental Management Systems (EMS). You can find the guidance via the Environmental Topics tab or alternatively select the following link Environmental Management Systems (EMS).

  • Consultation on proposed changes to the packaging recycling business targets

    See NI Future legislation or Scotland Future legislation for details of the Consultation

  • NetRegs:- FREE, ANONYMOUS, PLAIN ENGLISH GUIDANCE FOR BUSINESSES

  • NIEA Guidance - Greenfield Excavated Matrials in Construction

    NIEA and the CEF have developed a Regulatory Position to promote Sustainable re-use of natural excavated material from Greenfield sites.

    NIEA: Guidance on the Regulation of Greenfield Excavated Materials in Construction and Development

  • New GPP 2 Above Ground Oil Storage

    The replacements for the PPGs are being developed. Now available GPP 2 Above Ground Oil Storage

  • SEPA Consultation on an Intergated Authorisation Framework

    SEPA is asking for your views on the proposals for integrated authorisations.

    Consultation documents

  • GPP 24 Stables, Kennels and Catteries

    NEW GPP 24 now available: Stables, Kennels and Catteries

  • ENDS Award winner

    NetRegs; Winner of a prestigious ENDS award 2017

    Knowledge development category winner, see the ENDS Awards

  • NetRegs wins an ENDS Environmental Impact Award

    Knowledge development category winners, see the END Awards

  • EIA (Agriculture) Regulations for Northern Ireland

    Any person intending to alter the use or management of areas of uncultivated or semi-natural land must obtain prior approval from the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA).

    Read more on the DAERA website

  • Download our NEW leaflet today: Duty of Care for waste

    NetRegs have produced a new leaflet for Scottish businesses explaining what you must do to comply with YOUR duty of care for waste.

    Duty of Care for waste (Scotland) leaflet (PDF - 775KB)

     

NetRegs on NetRegs on youTube

View our latest videos & subscribe to our channel.

NetRegs Update Newsletter

Free monthly email newsletter with environmental updates for Northern Ireland and Scotland

Sign up for free today!

Permits

NIEA - Apply online

SEPA - Application forms