Environmental guidance for your business in Northern Ireland & Scotland

Oil storage

Oil spills account for one quarter of all pollution incidents in the UK. Leaks from oil containers are often caused by inadequate storage facilities and equipment, and poor maintenance and operation.

Oil includes petrol, diesel, central-heating oil, mineral and synthetic oils, vegetable and plant oils, heavy oils such as liquid bitumen, oil-based solvents such as kerosene, and waste oil.

If oil from your site enters the ground, surface water or groundwater you could be prosecuted for causing pollution and have to pay a fine. You could also have to pay substantial clean up costs.

This guide covers the legal requirements and sets out good practice for businesses that store oil. It explains how to store oil to reduce the risk of pollution, gives information on maintaining your oil containers and explains what to do if an oil spill occurs.

NIEA Helpline 0845 302 0008

SEPA Helpline 01786 457 700

NIEA and SEPA Pollution Hotline 0800 80 70 60

 

Additional resources

       

 

If you store any kind of oil at your commercial or domestic premises you may need to comply with a number of regulations controlling its storage. This will depend on how much and what type of oil you store, the type of site you have and the containers you use.

Comply with Oil Storage Regulations

The Oil Storage Regulations aim to ensure that you store oil safely and minimise the risk of pollution. They affect:

  • industrial and commercial businesses and institutional sites who store oil above ground in containers holding over 200 litres in Northern Ireland and in containers holding any volume in Scotland.
  • private dwellings with containers storing more than 3,500 litres in Northern Ireland and more than 2,500 litres in Scotland.

In Northern Ireland businesses who refine or distribute oil will also need to comply unless they store more than 2,500 tonnes of oil and are regulated under the Control of Major Accident Hazards (COMAH) Regulations.

These regulations apply to oil stored in containers both inside and outside of a building including:

  • tanks
  • intermediate bulk containers
  • oil drums
  • mobile bowsers.

The regulations also apply to portable containers in Scotland.

In Northern Ireland the Oil Storage Regulations do not apply if:

  • your container has a capacity of 200 litres or less
  • the oil is stored in a container wholly underground
  • the oil is stored on a farm and used for agricultural purposes
  • the oil is stored at a private dwelling in a container with a capacity of 3,500 litres or less.

From the 31 December 2015 the regulations now apply to all other remaining oil containers.

In Scotland the Oil Storage Regulations do not apply if:

  • the oil is stored in a container wholly underground unless the container is in an underground part of a building, eg in a basement
  • your premises are used for the onward distribution of oil
  • oil is stored according to the requirements of a pollution prevention and control Part A permit
  • the oil is stored at a private dwelling in a container with a capacity of 2,500 litres or less
  • the oil is uncut bitumen (as this will solidify at normal ambient temperatures, close to any spillage)

Comply with agricultural fuel oil regulations

In Northern Ireland, if you store oil for agricultural use on a farm, for example to produce heat or power, you must comply with separate regulations that govern how you must store it.

In Scotland you must comply with the Oil Storage Regulations.

Storing and using oil for Agriculture

Meet building regulations

If you store oil at a private dwelling (domestic oil storage), for example for your heating, you will need to comply with building regulations for any new or replacement domestic tanks.

Northern Ireland: How to comply with building regulation controls

Scotland: How to comply with building regulation controls

Register waste management licensing exemptions for storing waste oils

You must register an exemption from waste management licensing for certain activities. If you have an exemption you must comply with the exemption conditions in Northern Ireland or the objectives in Scotland.

If you store waste oils at a different site from where it was produced you will need to register a paragraph 18 exemption. You can store up to 3 cubic metres of waste oils at any one time in secure containers.

Northern Ireland Environment Agency: Paragraph 18 exemption

Scottish Environment Protection Agency: Waste management licensing exemptions

Comply with Control of Major Accident Hazards (COMAH) Regulations

In Scotland, if you store large quantities of petrol or diesel, check whether the COMAH Regulations affect you.

In Northern Ireland, if you store more than 2,500 tonnes of petroleum products you will need to comply with the COMAH Regulations.

You may need a major accident prevention policy, have to submit a safety report and prepare an on-site emergency plan. You may need a major accident prevention policy, have to submit a safety report and prepare an on-site emergency plan.

COMAH

Store oil safely

Even if oil storage controls don’t apply to you, you should still store your oil responsibly and consider meeting the requirements of the legislation to help prevent pollution.

If you allow oil to escape into the water environment - for example, if oil leaks or is spilled from any oil storage, including a tank, bund or pipework on your site - you are committing an offence and may be prosecuted or fined.

Preventing water pollution

The Oil Care Campaign promotes the responsible delivery, storage, use and disposal of oil and oil-related products. it allows you to search for your nearest oil disposal point.

The Oil Care Campaign

Further information

NIEA helpline 0845 302 0008

SEPA helpline 01786 457 700

NIEA and SEPA Water Pollution Hotline 0800 80 70 60

Contact your environmental regulator

DOENI: Oil storage guidance for Northern Ireland

SEPA: Oil storage guidance for Scotland

HSE: COMAH information

You should consider safety, security, access for deliveries and repairs, and maintenance needs when deciding where to locate your oil storage containers. This will help you comply with regulations and minimise the risk of pollution.

An oil storage container can include a tank, drum, mobile bowser or intermediate bulk container.

You should always store oil in a container that is above ground. Underground tanks and their associated pipework are a high risk to the environment as they are difficult to inspect and leaks may not be easy to detect.

GOV.UK Oil storage informations

SEPA: Code of practice for owners and operators of underground storage tanks

Avoid storing oil containers on roofs.

Try to position oil containers or stores where there is minimal chance of collision or impact, for example from moving vehicles. If the Oil Storage Regulations apply, you must ensure you protect the containers and the secondary containment system.

You should ensure that the surface of the area where deliveries are made is protected by an impermeable surface, and is away from surface water drainage systems. This will help you to avoid causing pollution from escaped oil.

Try not to store oil in a pollution risk area. This includes within 10 metres of a watercourse/waterway or within 50 metres of a well, spring or borehole. If this is unavoidable you may need to have additional pollution prevention measures.

See the page in this guideline: Oil storage container requirements

Avoid locating your container on a flood plain. It may float in the event of flooding, causing pipelines to break and oil to spill. If this is unavoidable, you must ensure that the container is fixed to a secure base or other measures are taken.

Your container should always be located within a secondary containment system (SCS), such as a bund. If the Oil Storage Regulations apply to your business or site, you must store your oil in a SCS.

See the page in this guideline: Secondary containment systems for oil storage containers

If you are unable to comply with any of the requirements above, you should contact the NIEA or SEPA for advice.

Contact your environmental regulator

Further information

DOENI: Oil storage guidance for Northern Ireland

SEPA: Oil storage regulations Including FAQs

PPG 27 Installation, decommissioning and removal of underground storage tanks (Adobe PDF – 96KB)

To store oil safely you must comply with the requirements of the Oil Storage Regulations on primary containers. These are the main containers oil is stored in and include:

  • tanks
  • intermediate bulk containers (IBCs) used for transport and storage
  • oil drums
  • mobile bowsers - an oil container that can't move under its own power, but can be moved between locations.

In Scotland the regulations apply to portable containers, eg five, ten or 20 litre oil cans.

What you must do

Check your oil containers

You must use a strong container that won't leak or burst in ordinary use. In Scotland this is the only requirement for portable oil containers with a capacity of less than 200 litres. If they are properly maintained, containers should last at least 20 years.

Proprietary tank systems are made with integral secondary storage containment for the primary container. You should consult the manufacturer of these systems for information on their appropriate use and whether they comply with oil storage legislation.

Oil storage containers must be stored within a suitable secondary containment system, for example a bund or drip tray.

For more information, see the page in this guideline: Secondary containment systems for oil storage containers.

If your container has any fittings and pipework, for example sight gauges, valves, fill or draw-off pipes or vent pipes, you must ensure they are located and operated correctly.

For more information, see the page in this guideline: Oil container pipework and fittings requirements.

Good practice

Even if the Oil Storage Regulations do not apply, you should still store your oil responsibly and use appropriate containers which meet the regulations.

PPG 2: Above ground oil storage tanks

Make sure your storage tank has been type tested to a recognised standard and manufactured to an ISO 9001-compliant quality assurance scheme, for example:

  • polyethylene tanks should comply with OFS T100
  • steel tanks should comply with either BS 799-5 or OFS T200 and be corrosion-resistant.

Make sure your container is marked with the product type and maximum capacity. You should also attach a notice with information on safe delivery and emergency procedures.

This is available from the Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA).

Contact your environmental regulator

Make sure only competent qualified technicians install or decommission your oil storage tank. For more information, see the page in this guideline: Maintaining your oil storage equipment

Ensure tanks are fully drained of oil and water before they are taken out of use. This liquid is a hazardous/special waste and must be disposed of legally. Contact the NIEA or SEPA if you find evidence that the ground underneath a tank has been contaminated.

Tanks and equipment contaminated with oil are classed as hazardous/special waste.

Hazardous/special waste

Further information

NIEA and SEPA Water Pollution Hotline 0800 80 70 60

Oil Care Campaign

DOENI: Oil storage guidance for Northern Ireland

SEPA: Oil storage regulations

PPG 2: Above ground oil storage tanks

PPG 21: Pollution incident response planning

PPG 26 Safe storage - drums and intermediate bulk containers

PPG 27 Installation, decommissioning and removal of underground storage tanks

Secondary containment systems (SCS) are used to catch any leaking oil, overfilling or other spills from a primary container, such as a tank, and its pipework. If you store oil on your premises you may have to comply with the Oil Storage Regulations which set minimum requirements to use SCS when storing oil. Bunds and drip trays are examples of SCS.

What you must do

Follow requirements for secondary containment

If you are required to use secondary containment, you must store oil containers within a bund, drip tray or any other suitable SCS.

For oil tanks, intermediate bulk containers (IBCs) and mobile bowsers, a bund is the main form of secondary containment. A drip tray is usually used for single or multiple oil drums.

For oil tanks, IBCs and mobile bowsers, your SCS must be able to hold at least 110 per cent of the maximum volume of a single container.

If you have more than one container stored in the same system, the SCS must be able to hold whichever of the following is greater:

  • 110 per cent of the largest container's storage volume
  • 25 per cent of the total volume of the containers.

For drum storage, your drip tray must be able to hold at least 25 per cent of the total storage capacity of the drums.

When you calculate the capacity of your SCS remember to deduct the volume taken up by the container supports, pipework and pumps. If you are located in a high rainfall area, you may need to increase the capacity or install a protective roof to stop water entering the SCS.

You must ensure that the base and walls of your bunds are impermeable to water and oil with no drainage outlets.

Always ensure there is ample space between the primary container and its SCS. A minimum distance of 750 millimetres between your tank and the bund wall is advisable so you have room to inspect and maintain the tank and bund.

You must locate your SCS away from areas where it could be damaged by impact, for example vehicle movements. If this is not possible you must take steps to minimise the risk of damage. You could provide protection, such as a barrier or bollards, for the SCS.

SEPA: Oil storage regulations

No pipes, valves or other openings to drain down the system must penetrate the base or wall of the SCS. All fill pipes and draw-off pipes from the tank that pass through the bund must be sealed carefully to prevent oil escaping. See the page in this guideline: Oil container pipework and fittings requirements

Comply with agricultural fuel oil regulations

In Northern Ireland, if you store oil for agricultural use on a farm, for example to produce heat or power, there are separate regulations that govern how you must store it.

Storing and using oil for Agriculture

Good practice to avoid causing pollution

Even if the Oil Storage Regulations do not apply, you should still use secondary containment for your oil containers.

PPG 2 Above ground oil storage tanks (Adobe PDF - 276KB)

You should have a pollution prevention plan in place, in case rainwater enters the bund and becomes contaminated with oil. Use an enclosed, proprietary tank system or roof over an open bund to prevent rainwater collecting.

If you have an open bund it may have a sump or low point that collects rainwater or spilt oil in the base of the bund. You can remove any unwanted liquids using a manual pump or by hand bailing.

You could use an automatic pumping system in remote locations which can distinguish between oil and water in the bund. However, to install one of these systems, you must find out from the Northern Ireland Environment Agency or SEPA where you can discharge the water.

Any water removed from the bund may be contaminated with oil, and you must dispose of it as hazardous/special waste.

Hazardous/special waste

Further information

NIEA and SEPA Water Pollution Hotline 0800 80 70 60

DOENI: Oil storage guidance for Northern Ireland

SEPA: Oil storage regulations

PPG 2 Above ground oil storage tanks (Adobe PDF - 276KB)

PPG 21: Pollution incident response planning

To comply with the Oil Storage Regulations you must ensure all pipework, above and below ground, is correctly positioned and properly maintained. There is a particular risk of oil leaks from poorly fitted pipes. Ideally, pipes should be above ground.

What you must do

Follow requirements for above-ground pipework

You must locate all pipework and fittings (ancillary equipment) within the secondary containment systems (SCS). This includes valves, filters, sight gauges and vent pipes.

Where a fill pipe is not within the SCS, you must use a drip tray to catch any oil spilled when the container is being filled. You should make sure this drip try is clean and empty before each delivery.

You must also:

  • ensure any fill pipe, draw-off pipe or vent pipe is properly supported
  • ensure that any sight gauge is properly supported and fitted with a valve that closes automatically when it's not in use
  • install pipework where there is minimal risk of collision or damage.

Prevent leaks from pipework

You must protect metal fill pipes, draw-off pipes or overflow pipes from corrosion and in Scotland do not use pipes that are permeable to hydrocarbon vapours.

In Northern Ireland you must position any vent pipe, tap or valve through which oil can be discharged from the tank into the open so any spilt oil is retained within the SCS.

Follow requirements for below-ground pipework

If pipework is underground, you must ensure that it:

  • has no mechanical joints, except where you can access them for inspection
  • is protected against corrosion and from physical damage
  • has adequate facilities for detecting leaks
  • is not permeable to hydrocarbon vapours.

Clearly mark the route of underground pipework on the ground and site plans to avoid accidental damage and help in servicing and maintenance.

Leak detection devices

You may decide to fit underground fill or draw-off pipes with a leak detection device. If you use a continuous leak detection device, make sure it's in working order and test it regularly and at least every five years in Scotland. Keep a record of the test results and any maintenance work completed.

If you don't use a continuous leak detection system you must test underground pipework:

  • before use
  • with mechanical joints every five years
  • at least every ten years.

Avoid spills from deliveries and dispensing oil

If a screw fitting or other fixed coupling is fitted to the tank, you must maintain it in good condition and use it when filling the tank.

If you can’t see the tank and any vent pipe from where the filling process is controlled, you must fit an automatic overfill prevention device. This could include an alarm or a fail safe device.

If you use a permanently attached, flexible pipe to deliver oil from the tank to a container or delivery pump, you must :

  • fit a tap or valve at the delivery end of the pipe which closes automatically when not in use
  • ensure that the tap or valve cannot be fixed in the open position, unless the pipe is fitted with an automatic shut off device.

When a delivery pipe is not in use you must ensure that it either:

  • is kept in a secure, locked cabinet with a drip tray
  • has a lockable valve (locked shut when not in use) where it leaves the container, and that it is kept within an SCS.

You must ensure that any pump is:

  • fitted with a valve in its feed line that stops the tank contents draining out if the pump or pipework to the pump is damaged
  • positioned to minimise any risk of damage
  • protected from unauthorised use.

Comply with agricultural fuel oil regulations

In Northern Ireland if you store oil for agricultural use on a farm, for example to produce heat or power, there are separate regulations that govern how you must store it.

In Scotland the Oil Storage Regulations apply to oil stored on farms.

Storing and using oil for Agriculture

Good practice

Even if the Oil Storage Regulations do not apply to your oil storage, you should still consider meeting the requirements of the regulations.

PPG 2 Above ground oil storage tanks (Adobe PDF - 276KB)

SEPA: Oil storage regulations

Further informaion

NIEA and SEPA Water Pollution Hotline 0800 80 70 60

DOENI: Oil storage guidance for Northern Ireland

SEPA: Oil storage regulations

PPG 2 Above ground oil storage tanks (Adobe PDF - 276KB)

PPG 21: Pollution incident response planning

A mobile bowser is an oil container that may have wheels or be transported on or by another vehicle, but it can't move under its own power. If you use a mobile bowser to store oil you must comply with the relevant requirements of the Oil Storage Regulations.

What you must do

Follow rules for using and storing mobile bowsers

You must ensure your bowser is in good condition and will not leak or burst in ordinary use. For more information, see the page in this guideline: Oil storage container requirements

Mobile bowsers must be stored within a suitable secondary containment system, for example a bund or a drip tray, or be a self-bunded bowser. For more information, see the page in this guideline: Secondary containment systems for oil storage containers.

You must fit locks to permanently fixed valves or taps on the bowser that are used to discharge oil to the open. You must lock these shut when the valve or tap is not in use.

If you deliver oil through a flexible pipe that is permanently attached to the bowser, you must ensure that:

  • the delivery end of the pipe is fitted with a manually operated pump or valve that closes automatically when it is not in use
  • the pump or valve is lockable and you keep it locked shut when it is not in use

In Scotland you must also secure any sight gauges to the mobile bowser, which must have a valve or tap that is locked shut when it is not in use.

For further information on securing pipework, see the page in this guideline: Oil container pipework and fittings requirements.

Good practice

Even if the Oil Storage Regulations do not apply to your oil storage, you should still consider meeting the requirements of the regulations. For more information on reducing the risk of pollution if you use mobile bowsers you can read Pollution Prevention Guideline (PPG) 2

PPG 2 Above ground oil storage tanks (Adobe PDF - 276KB)

Further information

NIEA and SEPA Water Pollution Hotline 0800 80 70 60

DOENI: Oil storage guidance for Northern Ireland

SEPA: Oil storage regulations

PPG 2 Above ground oil storage tanks (Adobe PDF - 276KB)

You should carry out a weekly check of containers, secondary containment systems (SCS), pipework and other ancillary equipment. This should include looking for:

  • damage or corrosion
  • any changes to a container's shape, eg bulging or distortion
  • oil stains or any leaks
  • closed or locked valves and gauges.

You should carry out routine maintenance of containers and SCS to prevent any risk of pollution. Keep a record of when inspections and maintenance are carried out and who by.

You should always look out for any signs of damage or interference to your tank or pipework. If you find any problems, get repairs carried out immediately by a competent, qualified technician. For information on preventing leaks from your pipework, see the page in this guideline: Oil container pipework and fittings requirements

As well as a weekly check, you should use a qualified technician to carry out a detailed annual inspection and service of your storage facilities, including:

  • checking the condition of tank surfaces, SCS and supports for pipework
  • checking the condition and operation of pipework and fittings
  • removing and disposing of any condensation water or sludge in your tank.

You should receive a report about your tank which details any faults that must be fixed before you can continue to use your oil storage.

Qualified technicians should be a member of a professional scheme for qualified tank installers, for example the Petroleum Equipment Installers and Maintenance Federation (PEIMF) or the Oil Firing Technical Association (OFTEC).

Good practice for storing oil underground

Below-ground tanks and their associated pipework are a high risk to the environment as they are difficult to inspect and leaks may not be immediately obvious.

You should pay extra attention to oil stored below ground to reduce these risks. You should:

  • Supervise deliveries to make sure that the tank is not overfilled.
  • Monitor the amount of oil you are using. If an unexpected increase occurs, investigate the cause - the container or pipework may have an undetected leak.
  • Maintain gauges, valves and pipework on a regular basis.

SEPA: Code of practice for owners and operators of underground storage tanks

Further information

NIEA and SEPA Water Pollution Hotline 0800 80 70 60

DOENI: Oil storage guidance for Northern Ireland

PPG 2 Above ground oil storage tanks (Adobe PDF - 276KB)

PEIMF: Contact details

OFTEC: Oil Storage technicians search

You should take prevention measures to reduce the risk of oil pollution occurring on your site. Have a pollution incident response plan to use in the event of a spill or leak, and ensure your staff are fully trained and know what to do when an incident occurs.

PPG 21: Pollution incident response planning

Keep a spill kit or other pollution control equipment close to your oil store so you can access it easily when you need it. This can include:

  • an oil spill kit with proprietary absorbent materials and drain blockers
  • gully seals
  • booms
  • sealing putty.

If a spill does occur, act immediately and try to prevent it from entering drains or surface waters. For example, use absorbent materials to help contain the spread of the oil and soak it up, and drain blockers to protect surface water drains.

Use the UK wide Pollution Hotline on Tel 0800 80 70 60 to report an incident and ask for help and advice about what to do.

You must never hose a spill down or use detergents to disperse it as you could cause a much worse pollution incident.

You must dispose of any absorbent or other materials contaminated with oil as hazardous/special waste.

Hazardous/special waste

Take precautions during oil deliveries

There's an increased risk of an oil spill during a delivery to your container. To help prevent pollution you should:

  • supervise deliveries
  • clearly label all tanks with their contents and storage capacity
  • check that your container has sufficient capacity before arranging and receiving a delivery.

Take particular care where taking a delivery to multiple tanks. Have clear instructions for delivering the right amount to each tank.

Further information

UK wide Pollution Hotline on Tel 0800 80 70 60

Oil Care Campaign

PPG 21: Pollution incident response planning

There are a number of publications and sources of further information that provide guidance on storing oil to prevent potential environmental impacts.

Pollution prevention guidelines

PPG 2: Above ground oil storage tanks

PPG 21: Pollution incident response planning

PPG 26 Safe storage - drums and intermediate bulk containers

PPG 27 Installation, decommissioning and removal of underground storage tanks

PPG 8: Safe storage and disposal of used oils

Oil Care Campaign

The Oil Care Campaign aims to prevent oil pollution and damage to the environment by providing best practice guidance to businesses on the safe disposal and management of oil. They are also responsible for promoting the Oil Bank Information Line, which guides you to where you can dispose of oil safely.

Oil Care Campaign

Oil storage guidance

There are a number of publications that provide best practice advice for storing oils and maintaining your storage facilities:

DOENI: Oil storage guidance for Northern Ireland

SEPA: Oil storage regulations Including FAQs

Watch our short video:

How to manage oil on site

Also on this site

How to prevent water pollution

Land contamination

Hazardous/special waste

This page provides links to the full text of key pieces of environmental legislation relating to oil storage. The websites hosting the legislation may list amendments separately.

If you are setting up an environmental management system (EMS) for your business, you can use this list to start compiling your legal register. Your legal adviser or environmental consultant will be able to tell you if other environmental legislation applies to your specific business.

Environmental management systems and environmental reports

Northern Ireland Oil Storage legislation

Control of Pollution (Oil Storage) (Northern Ireland) Regulations SR 2010/412.Imposes general requirements for preventing pollution of waterways and groundwaters from oil storage, particularly fixed tanks or mobile bowsers. Makes contravention a criminal offence.

Control of Pollution (Silage, Slurry and Agricultural Fuel Oil) Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 2003/319. Sets out conditions for storing crops being made into silage, slurry and certain fuel oil. Some exceptions apply.

Water (Northern Ireland) Order SI 1999/662 (including updates). Makes provision for discharge consents. Enables the Department of the Environment to set water quality objectives and prevent pollution from anti-pollution works.

Groundwater Regulations (Northern Ireland) SR 2009/254. Introduces classification systems in line with EU developments, makes it an offence to discharge listed substances within an authorisation, controls issuing and reviewing authorisations and consents. Cover enforcement, codes of practice and penalties.

Scotland Oil Storage legislation

Water Environment (Controlled Activities) (Scotland) Regulations SSI 2011/209. Authorises controlled activities such as discharges, abstractions, impoundments (dams and weirs) and engineering works in the water environment. Regulation of controlled activities is carried out through general binding rules, registrations or licences.

Water Environment (Oil Storage) (Scotland) Regulations SSI 2006/133. Sets out standards for the design and installation of oil storage containers, and timescales for businesses to comply with the rules.

You will also need to know about and comply with legislation on:

Water pollution

Duty of care

Hazardous/special waste

NetRegs Environmental Legislation

Whats new on NetRegs

  • Waste – Duty of Care Roles and Responsibilities

    The Northern Ireland Environment Agency has published a short guide to the duty of care responsibilities including advice and information for waste producers, carriers and those accepting, storing and treating waste.

    https://www.daera-ni.gov.uk/publications/waste-duty-care-responsibilities

  • Please let us know your thoughts on our new website

    What do you think about our new and improved website. We want your feedback on what you like, what you don’t like and ways we can continue to improve the website. Follow the link to complete the very short survey: NetRegs website – User feedback

  • NEW guidance on Environmental Management Systems

    We have recently updated and improved our guidance on Environmental Management Systems (EMS). You can find the guidance via the Environmental Topics tab or alternatively select the following link Environmental Management Systems (EMS).

  • Consultation on proposed changes to the packaging recycling business targets

    See NI Future legislation or Scotland Future legislation for details of the Consultation

  • NetRegs:- FREE, ANONYMOUS, PLAIN ENGLISH GUIDANCE FOR BUSINESSES

  • NIEA Guidance - Greenfield Excavated Matrials in Construction

    NIEA and the CEF have developed a Regulatory Position to promote Sustainable re-use of natural excavated material from Greenfield sites.

    NIEA: Guidance on the Regulation of Greenfield Excavated Materials in Construction and Development

  • New GPP 2 Above Ground Oil Storage

    The replacements for the PPGs are being developed. Now available GPP 2 Above Ground Oil Storage

  • SEPA Consultation on an Intergated Authorisation Framework

    SEPA is asking for your views on the proposals for integrated authorisations.

    Consultation documents

  • GPP 24 Stables, Kennels and Catteries

    NEW GPP 24 now available: Stables, Kennels and Catteries

  • ENDS Award winner

    NetRegs; Winner of a prestigious ENDS award 2017

    Knowledge development category winner, see the ENDS Awards

  • NetRegs wins an ENDS Environmental Impact Award

    Knowledge development category winners, see the END Awards

  • EIA (Agriculture) Regulations for Northern Ireland

    Any person intending to alter the use or management of areas of uncultivated or semi-natural land must obtain prior approval from the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA).

    Read more on the DAERA website

  • Download our NEW leaflet today: Duty of Care for waste

    NetRegs have produced a new leaflet for Scottish businesses explaining what you must do to comply with YOUR duty of care for waste.

    Duty of Care for waste (Scotland) leaflet (PDF - 775KB)

     

NetRegs on NetRegs on youTube

View our latest videos & subscribe to our channel.

NetRegs Update Newsletter

Free monthly email newsletter with environmental updates for Northern Ireland and Scotland

Sign up for free today!

Permits

NIEA - Apply online

SEPA - Application forms